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Queensland Bushfood Association Inc

PINK-FRUITED LIME BERRY Glycosmis trifoliata

Description : A bushy shrub or small tree, growing to a height of between 4 to 8 metres, usually to less than 4m in the garden. As the name suggests, the Lime Berry is related to the citrus, but the sweet, succulent, berries neither look nor taste like limes. Plants are quite hardy and start to bear fruit at a fairly early stage. Tiny white flowers are followed by large clusters of translucent pink berries, from 1 to 1.5 mm diameter, which start to appear in late Spring and will bear continually through most of the year, depending on climate.

Uses : The berries are best eaten, fresh, straight off the bush. The flesh is sweet, juicy and quite a pleasant flavour. Being in the Rutaceae family the Glycosmis is also a host plant for the swallowtail butterfly Papilio fuscus capaneus, so grow a few if you want both fruit and butterflies.

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BRUSH CHERRY Syzygium australe (Southern Form)

DESCRIPTION : The ‘southern’ form of S. australe is a small shrub to 4 m tall with a dense crown.

Leaves are opposite, elliptic in shape, 2.5 long with the apex shortly narrowed to a fine point. Upper surface is dark green and glossy, lower surface is paler. Flowers are white and are borne in small clusters at the ends of branches, occurring in April and October.

The fruits are a berry, pink to purplish-red in colour and are elliptic to rounded in shape to 2 cm long. Fruiting occurs in both early summer and early winter (December and June). Bark is brown and scaly.

USES : Fruits are succulent with a crisp texture and a pleasant, tangy flavour. They can be eaten raw or made into jam or cordial. Plants are suitable for a screen or wind break.

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MIDYIM or MIDGEN Austromyrtus dulcis

Description:In cultivation, A. dulcis has become a popular ground cover and foliage plant with many gardeners. It is quite adaptable to a variety of soils, providing they are well drained and is not too particular regarding its situation, growing well in full sun to dappled shade. In the sun it will form a dense, bushy shrub, 50cm high to 1.5m in diameter and in the shade it becomes a more open, sprawling ground cover, excellent for rockeries and over hanging retaining walls. Plants prefer an acidic soil with a pH of less than 6.5 and will tolerate light frosts and moderate salinity. New growth is coppery pink and softly hairy but the shrub is at its most attractive stage when in full fruit.Flowering starts in Spring, fruiting follows and can continue until late Autumn. The little fruits are whitish berries, up to 1cm round and speckled with tiny mauve spots.

Uses:The little fruits have a pleasantly, sweet, aromatic flavour with a hint of spice. They make an excellent jam or sauce but are at their best, freshly picked from your Bushfood garden and sprinkled over vanilla ice cream.

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SMALL-LEAVED TAMARIND Diploglottis campbellii

Description : Growing to a height of between 7 to 10 metres in the garden, the Small-leaved Tamarind forms a handsome tree with a dense crown which provides excellent shade and shelter.

Flowers are small, cream-brown, borne on multi-branched panicles and occur from November to January.

Fruits are large (to 6cm across) and quite spectacular, 3-lobed capsules that split open when ripe to reveal the seeds covered by the bright red or sometimes yellow, fleshy aril. Fruiting occurs between February to March and individual trees are capable of producing many kilos of fruit.

Uses : The aril or the flesh around the seed is the edible part which is refreshingly acid to taste. Its distinctive, tarty flavour lends itself to both sweet and savoury applications. It can be made into jams, jellies, drinks and sauces.

This tree is rare & endangered in its native habitat.

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NORTHERN or WILD TAMARIND Diploglottis diphyllostegia

Description: Growing to a height of between 6 to 10 metres in the garden, with a spreading crown. Flushes of new growth are decorative, covered with fine golden brown hairs giving it a delicate, fury appearance. A handsome tree, similar in many respects to its southern cousin, D. australis but much smaller.

Flowers are small, cream-brown, carried in large panicles and occur from August to November.

The fruit are yellowish, hairy, 2 to 3 lobed capsules about 2.5 cm across. The capsules split to reveal the seeds enclosed by a fleshy, orange-yellow aril. Fruiting occurs between September to December and individual trees are capable of producing a large quantity of fruit.

Uses: The aril is the edible part which is refreshingly acid to taste. Its sweet, tart flavour lends itself to both sweet and savoury applications. It can be made into jams, jellies, drinks and sauces.

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